Most disturbing news this week:

1. Australian fires: An estimated 480 million animals dead (that’s close to HALF A BILLION).

2. Krefeld zoo fire: Fire in primate enclosure, killing most, thanks to rogue New Year lanterns.

How’s your week going?

When I saw this video (below), I was like “Dayummmmm..” I mean what’s a party without a bowl of Doritos? That convenient [read: LAZY] option to just grab from the store to entertain guests or bring to a pot luck gathering.

The solution: Just gotta be a bit more creative and try healthier options then… like good ol’ carrot and celery sticks and dips. Or altenative corn chips that don’t have a bad rep (but probably cost a little more).

It’s funny how many of us would say we’re environmentally-conscious, but as we dig deeper and deeper, we realise that there’s a lot more to be done. Our consumption patterns more than we think.

It sure isn’t going happen over night. Doritos will still be a permanent feature in many parties. But with greater awareness, people can make better choices, inshaAllah. In any case, for me personally, its just another reason for me to stop eating junk.

To sign the petition against Doritos’ parent company PepsiCo from destroying the planet, click here.

If you want change, you have to be the change. Do it.

The logic that some people have just baffles me sometimes.

Take for example, the point made by Genting Group chairman, Mr Lim Kok Thay, regarding a question on the use of wild-caught dolphins for entertainment needs at the Marine Life Park in the newly opened Resorts World Singapore (RWS). In defending RWS’ position on the use of these dolphins, Mr Lim noted that these bottlenose dolphins are “definitely not on the endangered list“.

Well, that’s a relief, but we certainly wouldn’t want to be contributing to their extinction either. Just because an animal isn’t an endangered species, doesn’t give us the right to exploit and cause harm to them. What kind of hypocritical message would be we sending out to the public and especially children, where the supposed concern for dolphin conservation is done by kidnapping dolphins from their natural habitat?

Further analysis of the issue has demonstrated that it is not just dolphins that are being exploited, but also communities. The video below sheds some light on how communities in the Solomon Islands have been affected by the lucrative business of catching wild dolphins.

The controversy over the wild-caught dolphins in RWS has been ongoing for several years now, with the latest incident being the death of one of the dolphins, Wen Wen.  ACRES has been working tirelessly in its “Save the World’s Saddest Dolphins“, which has included a candle vigil for Wen Wen and also contributed to efforts to accuse RWS of violating Philippines law. Even so, much more pressure needs to be put on RWS to genuinely respect the rights of animals and communties, over the love for profit.

If you would like to support the cause, do write in to RWS here.